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Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD)

Christina Clark
Hometown:
Noblesville, Indiana
Previous Education:
BS’07, international relations, The College of William and Mary

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Student Spotlight

Balance is more important than you realize
Christina Clark, JD’11

Something for everyone: When I was deciding between law schools, it was really important to me to have a strong sense of community within the school. At the time, law school seemed intimidating enough without feeling like I was in competition with my classmates, which was the impression I got at some other schools. When I visited IU, the students were approachable, willing to offer words of advice, and really seemed to have a camaraderie with their classmates. I strongly believe that in addition to the great students, faculty, and reputation of the School, there is no greater place to be for law school than Bloomington. From great (and affordable) restaurants to an incredible music scene and even a year-round farmer's market, Bloomington really does have something for everyone. I couldn't be happier to be back in Indiana for these 3 years.

Balance: Don't be intimidated by those that talk the most in class and always seem to know what's going on. It isn't always the case that they do, and as long as you have kept up with your reading and put in the time to learn the material, you should be in good shape. Oh, and try to have some fun every once and awhile. Balance is more important than you realize.

Interning at Frost Brown Todd: The job at Frost Brown Todd was the result of a lot of preparation and a little luck. I knew coming in that I wanted to work at a firm, and as soon as we could begin applying for jobs, I was prepared with contacts inside the firms I hoped to work for as well as all my materials and recommendations. 1L firm jobs can be hard to come by, but you really just have to take the initiative to set up informal meetings with attorneys, express your interest, and make yourself stand out from the crowd when you get their attention. Once I got the job, my experience there was invaluable. Not only was I able to gain insight into the more practical details of the legal system, but my legal research and writing skills improved immensely. The greatest piece of advice I could give someone who does get a firm job is to seek as much feedback as you can. The attorneys that are willing to sit down and critique (or praise) your work are the ones you learn the most from, and their advice will ultimately help you be more a more valuable associate in the long run.

My best memory of school thus far? Finishing my last final of first semester and knowing that the RscaryS part was over and that I really could do it.

Getting away: I actually try to study away from the Law School when I can. Especially in your first year, it's easy to be intimidated by what you feel you should be doing because of how you think others are studying. I have a quiet corner in my apartment where I'm able to get a lot of work done away from some of the things that would distract me at school.